AutoDraw

Can you draw a brain in just 3 seconds? Probably not, at least unless you use some help from Google. AutoDraw by Google Creative Lab is an AI experiment, which lets you make a quick doodle, then tries to guess what it is, and complete it. It does not always work, but it keeps improving and is fun to play with. Also, it shows the powerful capabilities of machine learning. To try AutoDraw, just click that big orange brain below.

XKCD Comics

XKCD is one of the most successful comics online of all time. Marketed as a “webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language”, it manages to poke fun at all of these in various highly creative ways. Due to its numerous STEM references, XKCD is appreciated especially by geek communities. You can see one of our favorite strips below, a clever joke about classic chess puzzles.

To get to the XKCD website, simply click the image below.

Brandscape

UPDATE: The game Brandscape is not active anymore.

Here is a nice pop-culture puzzle quiz by our friends at Funding Circle. They have created a colorful painting with 60 hidden references to famous brands in it, which you must find and recognize correctly. The puzzle is fiendishly hard but really fun to solve. To play it, just click the image below. Good luck!

Free Rice

What is better than solving problems and learning new things? Doing exactly that, while fighting the hunger in Africa! “Free Rice” is a website, on which you choose a topic (vocabulary, science, math, etc.), and every time you answer correctly to a question, you contribute 10 grains of rice to people who need them. By clicking the banner below, you will be redirected to freerice.com. Just make sure to disable your ad-blockers, since hiding the (non-intrusive) ads may prevent you from accumulating donations.

The Evolution of Trust

Game Theory is an intriguing subject in Mathematics, with various real-life applications. Even though many people have heard about the “Prisoner’s Dilemma” – one of the most famous problems in the field, few have delved deeper into the theory. Fortunately, Nicky Case (also a creator of “Parable of the Polygons”) is here to help again, by educating us in a fun, engaging manner. Check out his quick, 30 minutes introduction to Game Theory by clicking the image below.

Kurzgesagt

Constant learning is important, but often times a very boring process. To tackle this issue, the guys from Kurzgesagt have started releasing new, engaging, educational videos every few weeks. Some of the puzzling topics they cover are A.I. (artificial intelligence), finance, the Big Bang, and many others. Both the quality of the production and the content itself are very high, so we recommend all of our friends to watch these videos.

So, do not waste time and go check Kurzgesagt’s website by clicking the image below, or simply visit the official YouTube channel.

The Master Theorem

In case you have never heard about “the secret society of puzzle solvers” at The Master Theorem, then get ready to face about 50 of the most creative, challenging and original puzzles you can find on the web. Even though the website rarely has been updated in the last few years, it can offer tens of hours of problem solving to all newcomers. In order to sign up and explore everything TMT has to offer, you must first complete one of the numerous puzzles posted there. An easy one you can start with is “Old McDonald”, which can be solved using this… SPOILER.

Ouverture Facile

In case you enjoyed our exciting puzzle crime story “Detective Sanders and the Zodiac Killer”, you may want to try some other similar browser puzzles. One of our favorites is “Ouverture Facile” (“Easy Opening” from French), consisting of over 90 different levels. Test your puzzle skills by clicking the image below and see how far you can get. After you finish with Ouverture Facile, you can check also “Notpron”“God Tower”“Weffriddles”, and “The Python Challenge”.

The Zoomquilt

You may not know this, but we have a strange penchant for optical illusions, fractals, and other mind-perplexing images. That’s why we got so impressed when we saw for the first time the “infinite-zoom” artwork by Nikolaus Baumgarten. Bearing the suitable name “The Zoomquilt”, this seemingly never-ending image instantly became our favorite screen-saver. Take a look at it by clicking the image below, and if you like it, make sure to search YouTube for other similar illustrations.