Guess the Fruits

You are given 3 boxes – one labeled “Apples”, one labeled “Bananas”, and one labeled “Apples and Bananas”. You are told that the labels on the boxes have been completely mismatched, i.e. none of the three labels is put on its correct box. How can you open just one box and pick a random fruit from it, so that after seeing the fruit, you can guess correctly the contents of every box out of the three?

Open the box labeled “Apples and Bananas”. If you pick a banana from it, then the box labeled “Bananas” will contain apples, and therefore the box labeled “Apples” will contain apples and bananas. Similarly, if you pick an apple from it, then the box labeled “Apples” will contain bananas, and therefore the box labeled “Bananas” will contain apples and bananas”.

Unfaithful

Jack is looking at Anne, but Anne is looking at George. Jack is married, but George is not. Is a married person looking at an unmarried person?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Cannot be determined 

The answer is YES. If Anne is unmarried, then Jack is married and is looking at an unmarried person. If not, then she is married and is looking at an unmarried person.

Vowels and Even Numbers

“If there is a vowel written on one side of a card, then there is an even number written on the other side.”
How many of these four cards do you need to flip in order to check the validity of this sentence?

What would the answer be if you know that each card contains one letter and one number?

You need to flip all cards except for the second one. If each card contains one letter and one number, then you need to flip only A and 7.

Three Daughters

Two friend mathematicians meet each after a long time and have the following conversation:

– I have 3 daughters, the product of their ages is 36.
– I can’t figure out how old they are, can you tell me more?
– Sure, the sum of their ages is equal to the number of my house.
– I know your house number, but still can’t figure out the ages of your daughters.
– Also, my eldest daughter is called Monica.
– OK, now I know how old your daughters are.

What ages are the three daughters of the mathematician?

Using the first clue, we find that there are 8 possibilities:

(1, 1, 36) -> sum 38
(1, 2, 18) -> sum 21
(1, 3, 12) -> sum 16
(1, 4, 9) -> sum 14
(1, 6, 6) -> sum 13
(2, 2, 9) -> sum 13
(2, 3, 6) -> sum 11
(3, 3, 4) -> sum 10

Since the second mathematician couldn’t guess the ages even after the second clue, the sum has to be 13. Therefore the only possible options are (1, 6, 6) and (2, 2, 9). However, the third clue suggests that there is an “eldest” daughter and then the correct answer is 2, 2 and 9.

The Warden and the Three Doors

An evil warden holds you as a prisoner but offers you a chance to escape. There are 3 doors A, B, and C. Two of the doors lead to freedom and the third door leads to lifetime imprisonment, but you do not which door is what type. You are allowed to point to a door and ask the warden a single yes-no question. If you point to a door that leads to freedom, the warden does answer your question truthfully. But if you point to the door that leads to imprisonment, the warden answers your question randomly, saying either “YES” or “NO” by chance. Can you figure out a way to escape the prison?

You can point towards door A and ask whether door B leads to freedom. If the warden says “YES”, then you open door B. It can not lead to imprisonment because this would mean that door A leads to freedom and the warden must have told you the truth. If the warden says “NO”, then you open door C. This is because either the warden lied, and then the imprisonment door is A, or he told you the truth, and then the imprisonment door is B.

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